NEW NASCAR 2014 Chase Rules

This is information from the official press release for the new 2014 NASCAR Chase Rules

Eligibility for the Chase for the NASCAR Sprint Cup

The top 15 drivers with the most wins over the first 26 races will earn a spot in the NASCAR Chase Grid – provided they have finished in the top 30 in points and attempted to qualify for every race (except in rare instances). The 16th Chase position will go to the points leader after race No. 26, if he/she does not have a victory. In the event that there are 16 or more different winners over 26 races, the only winless driver who can earn a Chase Grid spot would be the points leader after 26 races.

If there are fewer than 16 different winners in the first 26 races, the remaining Chase Grid positions will go to those winless drivers highest in points. If there are 16 or more winners in the first 26 races, the ties will first be broken by number of wins, followed by NASCAR Sprint Cup Series driver points.

As was implemented in 2011, prior to the start of the Chase, all Chase Grid drivers will have their points adjusted to 2,000, with three additional bonus points added to their total for each win in the first 26 races.

Chase for the NASCAR Sprint Cup Structure

After the third Chase race, the Chase Grid will be left with 12 drivers. After the sixth Chase race, the field will drop to eight drivers, and following the ninth Chase race, only four drivers will remain in championship contention for the NASCAR Sprint Cup title.

The first round (races 27-29) will be called the Challenger Round. If a driver in the Chase Grid wins a Challenger Round race, the driver automatically advances to the next round. The remaining available positions 1-12 that have not been filled based upon wins will be based on points. Each will then have their points reset to 3,000.

The second round (races 30-32) will be called the Contender Round. Likewise, if a driver in the top 12 in points wins a race in the Contender Round, the driver automatically advances to the next round. The remaining available positions 1-8 that have not been filled based upon wins will be based on points. Each will then have their points reset to 4,000.

The third round (races 33-35) will be called the Eliminator Round. If a driver in the top eight in points wins a race in the Eliminator Round, the driver automatically advances to the next round. The remaining available positions 1-4 that have not been filled based upon wins will be based on points. Each will then have their points reset to 5,000.

Additionally, drivers who are eliminated in the Contender and Eliminator Rounds will have their points readjusted. Each eliminated driver will return to the Chase-start base of 2,000 (plus any regular season wins bonus points), with their accumulated points starting with race No. 27 added. This will allow all drivers not in contention for the NASCAR Sprint Cup title to continue to race for the best possible season-long standing, with final positions fifth-through-16th still up for grabs.

Four Drivers, First-to-the-Finish Championship Finale

The 36th and final race of the season will be the NASCAR Sprint Cup Championship. Simply stated, the highest finisher in that race among the remaining four eligible drivers will win the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series title.

Bonus points for laps led will not apply in the season finale, so the official finishing position alone will decide the champion.

Note: All rules outlined above also apply to the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series owner championship structure.

New Chase Rules PDF <—- CHECK IT OUT because it helps explain the new rules

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2 Responses to “NEW NASCAR 2014 Chase Rules”

  1. Bill Price April 8, 2014 at 10:13 am #

    Hypothetical situation. For simplicity lets number the chase drivers 1 through 16. In each of the first 3 races drivers 13, 14, 15 and 16 all crash on the 1st lap and cannot continue. Ten laps later, driver 2 blows an engine and cannot continue. Driver 1 wins all 3 races. Points are reset equally for drivers 1 through 12. Then in each of the next 3 races, drivers 9, 10, 11 and 12 all crash on the 1st lap and cannot continue, and 10 laps later driver 2 crashes and cannot continue. Driver 1 wins all 3 races. Points are reset equally for drivers 1 through 8. In the next 3 races drivers 5, 6, 7 and 8 are all involved in a crash on the 1st lap and cannot continue. Driver 2 blows an engine 10 laps later and cannot continue. Driver 1 wins all 3 races. Points are reset equally for drivers 1 through 4. In the final race, drivers 1, 3 and 4 are all involved in a crash on the 1st lap and cannot continue. Twenty laps later, driver 2 blows an engine and cannot continue. So driver 2 wins the championship with 10 DNFs in the chase and driver 1, with 9 wins and 1 DNF does not.

    I know this is an extreme example, but really???????

  2. Jim Myers April 27, 2014 at 8:06 pm #

    I think that NASCAR is trying to completely ruin the sport! Why don’t you just go back to letting the Good Old Boys race from the first race to the last one with the driver with the most points is champion. It can’t take a rocket scientist to figure this out.. The fan base is getting smaller and if you can’t see it you must be blind. The way things are going now NASCAR will pick one driver at the starting of the season, before the first race, and make him the champion for that year and just forget about the racing.

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